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Missing and Unidentified Persons Conference

Sep 19-21, 2017 | Atlanta, GA | Conference


Titled "Multiple Victims Events: Implications for Investigation, Search, Rescue, and Recovery", the conference will focus on the tragic circumstances behind many missing persons reports, whether due to mass incidents or criminal events. You will learn effective strategies for responding to mass incidents, search and rescue, death and forensic investigations, recovery of unidentified remains, and missing person’s cases. The National Criminal Justice Training Center (NCJTC) of Fox Valley Technical College is partnering again this year with the National Association For Search And Rescue (NASAR) to continue its tradition of offering dynamic speakers who provide broad knowledge and expertise to the program.

$400 Register

Details


About

**IMPORTANT NOTICE: Our registration system will be down on Friday Sept 15. If you wish to attend the conference, please contact Helen Connelly at 920-915-6956 or at dcoffice@fvtc.edu.** The FEMA sponsored session on DAY THREE of the conference has been cancelled due to recent events. We are sorry for any inconvenience this may have caused you. **GEORGIA POST CREDITS** are available for this conference. **Missing Persons Conference Flyer and Vendor/Sponsor Information** can be found in Resources tab of this webpage.

What's In It For You

Upon completion of this conference, you will be able to: * Identify strategies to improve outcomes of and responses to complex missing person cases * Describe current trends and risks related to the disappearance of vulnerable populations * Identify strategies for effectively responding to and recovering from mass incidents and disasters * Identify and apply critical tools and technologies to support missing person searches and investigations * Acquire the critical skills needed to effectively manage missing person searches * Examine best practices for the recovery and identification of unidentified remains * Explore techniques to support victims and families

Is this training for you?

The following would benefit from this training:
• Community Member
• Correctional Officer
• Court System Personnel
• Emergency Management
• Law Enforcement
• Law Enforcement Support
• Prosecutors
• Social Workers
• Tribes/Tribal Partners
• Victim Service Providers

About the Venue

Sheraton Atlanta Hotel 165 Courtland St NE Atlanta, GA 30303 (404) 659-6500

Lodging Options

Sheraton Atlanta Hotel 165 Courtland St NE Atlanta, GA 30303 The room block booking deadline has expired. If you are still looking for accommodations at the Sheraton, please contact Helen Connelly at dcoffice@fvtc.edu. She will assist you with lodging during the conference.

All Scheduled Trainings

No other dates for this training are scheduled at this time.


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Notice of Federal Funding and Federal Disclaimer
Notice of Federal Funding and Federal Disclaimer This Web site is funded in part through grants from BJA, COPS, ​OJJDP, OJP, OVC, SMART, and U.S. Department of Justice. Neither the U.S. Department of Justice nor any of its components operate, control, are responsible for, or necessarily endorse, this Web site (including, without limitation, its content, technical infrastructure, and policies, and any services or tools provided).​
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Missing and Unidentified Persons Conference

Sep 19-21, 2017 | Atlanta, GA



Sep 18, 2017


Time
Session

5:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Welcome Reception and Registration



Sep 19, 2017


Time
Session

8:30 AM - 9:00 AM
Welcome and Conference Opening
Darryl K. Tolleson, Deputy Chief Commander- Criminal Investigations Division, Atlanta Police Department ; Jay Neal, Executive Director of the Georgia Criminal Justice Coordinating Council; and Chris Boyer, Executive Director, National Association for Search And Rescue will provide opening remarks for the Conference. Missing and Unidentified Person Conference Service Award will be presented to Detective Sergeant Jason Moran, Cook County Sheriff's Police Department, by Brad Russ, Director, National Criminal Justice Training Center of Fox Valley Technical College.

9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Why Am I Here? Why Are You Here?
What brings us all here together? Why is it important and how can we use what we have in this room to bring about changes and improvements in the way we search for and locate missing persons? Learn how the Missing Children Society of Canada developed the first of its kind rapid response network to bring missing children home safely and how you can use takeaways from this session to your own community.
Speakers:
Amanda Pick - CEO, Missing Children Society of Canada | Cliff O'Brien - Superintendent, Calgary Police Department

10:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Break


10:15 AM - 12:00 PM
The Art of Possibilities... Panel Discussion
The Art of Possibilities … what does this mean? Leaders in the field representing different industries and disciplines will bring their knowledge and expertise to explore how, through synergy, forward thinking, cutting edge tools, and innovative technology – we can make an important and significant impact in our work with missing and unidentified persons. From facial recognition technology, to story mapping, to effective collaboration using digital and professional expertise, this opening session will offer new possibilities and knowledge to bring back to your community.
Speakers:
Carl Rebstock - FirstNet | Amanda Pick - CEO, Missing Children Society of Canada | Patty Wetterling - Parent | Wyly Wade - President and CEO, Biometrica Systems, Inc. | Robert Pierce - U. S. Geological Survey | Theresa Hopkins - Navajo Nation | John Beck - ESRI | John Bischoff - National Center for Missing and Exploited Children | Jason Moran - Detective Sergeant, Cook County Sheriff's Police Department

12:00 PM - 1:15 PM
Lunch Break
On your own

1:15 PM - 3:00 PM
Investigation Track #1: Why Work Together?
"The Benefits of Partnerships in Missing and Unidentifed Persons Cases". While missing and unidentified persons cases have always been the purview of law enforcement it may be necessary to engage professional and organized Search and Rescued (SAR) Teams with the special knowledge and experience to assist in certain aspects of cases or incidents. There are hundreds of organizations with thousands of trained professionals in the art and science of search and rescue. This workshop will focus on why volunteer SAR organizations are not always utilized, and how they can be used as a force multiplier by tapping on their honed skills from not only searching for missing persons in the wilderness but also in the urban environment.
Speaker:
Christopher S. Young - Reserve Deputy ; Chairman-Bay Area Search and Rescue Council (BASARC)

1:15 PM - 3:00 PM
Resources Track #1: NamUs
Emergency response agencies need to be given real-time, victim-oriented situational awareness that can quickly supply data to help guide the response. By providing a central clearinghouse that aids multiagency coordination by self-serving real-time data to authorized agency officials, the NamUs Critical Incident Solution will soon be available to offer a vital component to emergency planning and response. This presentation will describe the overall upgrade of NamUs, and will also offer concrete and effective strategies, approaches, and techniques for collecting, consolidating and reconciling lists of missing and deceased persons who fall victim to tragic circumstances.
Speakers:
Emily Craig, PhD - Critical Incident Coordinator | Carrie Sutherland - Regional System Administrator, NamUs

1:15 PM - 3:00 PM
Search and Recovery Track #1: MIssing and Murdered Women- The Problem and Response
From 1979 to 1992, homicide was the third-leading cause of death of Indian females aged 15 to 34, and 75 percent were killed by family members or acquaintances. Since that time, a study by the U.S. Department of Justice has found that in some tribal communities, American Indian women face murder rates that are more than 10 times the national average. Since 2005, there has been increased awareness of the pattern of the disappearance of Native women and the failure of the criminal justice system to adequately respond to the crisis. This session will provide an overview and discussion of this crisis and the importance of increased public awareness.
Speakers:
Rebecca Balog - Grants Compliance Manager, National Indigenous Women's Resource Center | Princella Parker RedCorn - Omaha Tribe of Nebraska, National Indigenous Women's Resource Center Communications Officer

3:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Break


3:15 PM - 5:00 PM
Investigation Track #2: Barway Collins: A Missing Child, A Murdered Son, and a Father Prosecuted
This presentation examines the disappearance and subsequent murder of 10 year old Barway Collins. Choices made by the police in the initial minutes and hours of the investigation were key in finding Barway and proving the case. The case involved complex issues of police investigation including coordination of federal, state and local authorities, use of new technology, intense media and public involvement and public interest. Investigative strategies as well as lessons learned for complex cases will be discussed. The use of Google technology with WiFi, which was used in this jurisdiction to solve the case, will be discussed.
Speakers:
Ann Sweasy - Senior Assistant Hennepin County Attorney | Stephanie Revering - Chief of Police, City of Crystal, MN

3:15 PM - 5:00 PM
Search and Recovery Track #2: For the Record- A Case Study of the Victoria Stafford Search
This 2009 abduction case in Woodstock Ontario changed how technologies were used to record police search efforts. Challenges included how to present the data in the criminal justice system that was not keeping pace with technology. Through a case overview participants will learn how police search teams changed their documentation system to one that was capable of: recording a high volume of tasks, was search capable, prepared for disclosure and ready for trial.
Speaker:
Jamie Stirling - President SAR-1, Provincial SAR Coordinator, Ontario Provincial Police (retired)

3:15 PM - 5:00 PM
Resources Track #2: Lessons Learned from Katrina
Family reunification is not often a priority in disaster planning. There are a many critical issues to consider for children who become separated from their parents and guardians following a disaster. Children separated from those who best understand their individual needs makes their coping with reality more difficult, adding to their anxiety and stress. If not planned for or protected properly, these minors may be susceptible to maltreatment, abuse, kidnapping and in the most extreme cases, exploitation. Lessons from on jurisdiction during Katrina will clearly underscore these concerns. This session will describe the technical assistance available from NCMEC to manage the daunting task of reunifying children with their parents or legal guardians.
Speakers:
Sharon Hawa - Manager, Emergency Preparedness and Response, NCMEC | Sgt. Stacey Pearson - Special Victims Unit/Louisiana Clearinghouse for Missing & Exploited Children/AMBER


Sep 20, 2017


Time
Session

8:30 AM - 9:00 AM
Opening Remarks/Housekeeping/Announcements


9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Scratching the Surface: 27 years of Questions, Victimization, and Advocacy
This presentation is a multifaceted review of the impact of a long-term missing person case involving multiple victims. 28 years ago, twelve-year-old Jared Scheierl was abducted, sexually assaulted, and released. Ten months later, on October 22nd, 1989, eleven-year-old Jacob Wetterling was abducted, sexually assaulted, and murdered. On September 6th, 2016, the offender confessed to the victimization of both Jared and Jacob. This presentation consists of three perspectives on this long-term case.
Speakers:
Patty Wetterling - Parent | Jared Scheierl - Surviving victim | Jane Straub - Victim Advocate

10:00 AM - 10:15 AM
Break


10:15 AM - 12:00 PM
The Art of Possibilities... A Closer Look at Technology- Facial Recognition Technology
"Using Facial Recognition to Track Crime AND Find Missing Persons". Facial recognition technology is being used today in businesses, aviation, and law enforcement to combat crime and protect citizens. How does this technology apply to missing and unidentified persons? Learn how this technology work and how it can benefit your agency.
Speaker:
Wyly Wade - President and CEO, Biometrica Systems, Inc.

12:00 PM - 1:15 PM
Lunch
On own

1:15 PM - 3:00 PM
Investigation Track #3: What We Can Learn from the Green River Killer
The Green River Killings started in July 1982 in Seattle, Washington, and spanned a period of two decades. In 2001, Gary L. Ridgway was connected to what was up to that point, one of the most expensive and the largest unsolved serial murder case in the United States. Ridgway was identified as a suspect in 1984, but not charged until DNA and forensic paint analysis was used to connect victims to Ridgway. This case study presentation will give an overview of the victims in which forensic evidence linked Ridgway to the series.
Speaker:
Katherine M. Brown - Assistant, Professor of Criminal Justice, Tarleton State University/Sam Houston State University

1:15 PM - 3:00 PM
Resources Track #3: Soil and Atmospheric Scent Dynamics
K9 teams are commonly used to find clandestine graves of missing persons by detecting scent plumes from them. Scent in plumes originates from the cadaver and is transported through soil and any surface boundary layer into the air where it is carried by wind to the dog’s nose. Yet, little is known about scent dynamics (how scent moves) from a buried cadaver to the dog’s nose. This presentation help handlers understand and evaluate search conditions, choose conditions that offer a greater probability of success, understand the impact of scent dynamics on search tactics and choose tactics more likely to succeed
Speaker:
Tom Osterkamp - Professor Emeritus, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, Alaska

1:15 PM - 3:00 PM
Search and Recovery Track #3: Managing the Media- Sandy Hook School Shooting
On December 14, 2012, twenty children and six adults were murdered in Sandy Hook, Connecticut by Adam Lanza, who had earlier killed his mother, Nancy Lanza, in their Sandy Hook home. As police approached the school, Lanza took his own life. Lt. J. Paul Vance served as the Public Information Officer for the Connecticut State Police and the voice of the Sandy Hook tragedy at that time. This session will cover lessons learned and how to navigate and manage several law enforcement agencies. Information on effective strategies for working with the media will be discussed.
Speaker:
Lt. Paul Vance - Commanding Officer Traffic & Special Ops

3:00 PM - 3:15 PM
Break


3:15 PM - 5:00 PM
Investigation Track #4: Serial Predators and Human Trafficking-
" Tools in Recovering Victims of Human Trafficking". Human trafficking, and specifically the commercial sex trafficking of children, has become one of our nation's top concerns in the last few years. Law Enforcement places tremendous effort into identifying and rescuing children who are being sex trafficked by running covert operations, online, in hotels, and on the streets. But one major piece of evidence that is missing from this tactic. This session takes a closer look at indicators that may suggest a runaway is a possible victim of serial predators and human trafficking, and will provide specifics on how to use runaway reports to initiate human trafficking investigations, working within your department to implement this new investigative tool.
Speaker:
Jenni Thompson - Special Projects Manager, Polly Klass Foundation

3:15 PM - 5:00 PM
Search and Rescue Track #4: Tools and Techniques of the Trade
"Search for the Missing on Land, at Sea, and from the Air". K9s are an effective tool in the recovery of missing and deceased individuals in a variety of environments. K9s can be utilized to locate drowned victims to aid in body and evidence recovery. K9s are also a valuable tool in the search for human remains in wilderness settings. With their ability to hunt for, locate, and alert on human remains, K9s assist law enforcement in locating scattered remains, buried bodies, bring closure to families, assist in evidence recovery, and lead law enforcement to weapons and tools utilized in the crimes. This presentation will discuss the capabilities and limitations of the cadaver dog, and how a K9 can assist in the recovery of deceased individuals and evidence, both on water and in the wilderness setting.
Speakers:
Julie Starbuck - K9 Coordinator, Vice President | Michael Hadsell - President

3:15 PM - 5:00 PM
Resources Track #4: Canada's Missing Person DNA Program
DNA has long been a powerful identification tool for criminal investigations. New changes to Canada’s DNA Identification Act has enabled the creation of three humanitarian DNA indices, the Missing Persons Index, the Relatives of Missing Persons index, and the Human Remains Index, to support missing persons and unidentified remains investigations. By the beginning of 2018, Canada’s National Centre for Missing Persons and Unidentified Remains (NCMPUR) will be offering law enforcement, medical examiners and chief coroners the power of DNA comparison and matching in the national DNA database . This presentation will offer missing persons and unidentified remains investigators information about the NCMPUR’s new National Missing Persons DNA Program, its processes, the role and investigative power of this new DNA service in combination with NCMPUR’s existing investigative services, current issues, and implications on international investigatons.
Speaker:
Laria Ignacio-Morissette - Forensic Scientist, Royal Canadian Mounted Police

3:15 PM - 5:00 PM
Resources: Responding to International Parental Child Abductions
International parental child abduction involves the unlawful removal or attempted removal of a child from the United States or the unlawful retention in another country by a parent or family member. These cases present unique challenges to law enforcement and prosecutors. The panel will discuss the applicable laws and legal remedies related to international parental child abduction, available federal resources to aid the investigation and the roles played by local law enforcement, the FBI, and the State Department as initial responders and investigators. You will also gather appropriate strategies related to the criminal prosecution of the taking parent, risk factors for abduction, prevention strategies and techniques, and mechanisms for effectuating the safe return of the child.
Speakers:
Ann McGahuey - Office of Children's Issues, U.S. Department of State | Jennifer Toritto Leonardo - Senior Trial Attorney, Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section, U.S. Department of Justice | Lauren Kupersmith - Trial Attorney, Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section, U.S. Department of Justice | Anthony Manganaro - Special Agent, Federal Bureau of Investigation


Sep 21, 2017


Time
Session

8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
Why You Need Family Assistance Centers (and the Who, What, Where, When and How of Operating One)
In the aftermath of a mass casualty event, a Family Assistance Center(FAC) benefits not just families and loved ones, but also the agencies and organizations assisting them. This first course will discuss the value of incorporating a family assistance center into emergency response operations. Participants will gain an understanding of which key stakeholders need to be involved, what resources and services should be provided, command and control considerations, facility selection and set-up, and daily FAC operations.
Speaker:
Ken Jenkins - Principal, Crisis Response Strategist, NavAid Crisis Consulting Group

8:30 AM - 12:00 PM
Without a Trace: The Unresolved Disappearance of Glenn Pennie
In October 2004, Mr. Glenn Pennie disappeared from his residence without any evidence that he had done so voluntarily or due to nefarious circumstances. Since then extensive efforts have been undertaken to identify the nature and circumstances surrounding his disappearance. Search and rescue, law enforcement investigation personnel, State and Federal collaboration, and periodic media coverage have been part of this investigation, all with no tangible results. This presentation will provide an overview of the case and explore the myriad resources and techniques used, including the use of the Analysis of Competing Hypothesis (ACH) tool to rank hypotheses for further resource allocation and investigation will be highlighted.
Speakers:
Michael Holsapple - Detective Sergeant | John Williams - Detective | Gregory Czar, PhD - Forensic Psychologist | Ron Glaus, PhD - Forensic Psychologist | Michael Black - Special Deputy Computer Analysis

8:30 AM - 12:00 PM
How to Incorporate Diverse State and National Resources to Locate and Identify Missing
NIJ estimates that there are over 40,000 unidentified remains in the US and as many as 100,000 active missing person cases at any given time. Washington State embarked on a major initiative to identify how many additional missing and unidentified persons cases there were in the state in addition to state databases. Tasks included identifying which cases lacked dental and DNA by cross checking and compiling data from private sites and other government run databases such as NamUs; conducting queries to the state lab as well as outside labs for the housing of associated case DNA (family and direct); comparing NCIC results to establish a list of cases that had DNA running in CODIS, at the state level, or cases that that were updated with NCIC to reflect the location of DNA and Dental. Challenges at the state and national level regarding databases and resources, and resources used to solve these cases will be discussed.
Speakers:
Andrea Blume - Detective | Carrie Gordon - Missing and Unidentified Persons Unit Manager | Kathy Taylor - State Forensic Anthropologist

10:15 AM - 12:00 PM
Tongue Tied: Navigating Difficult Conversations & Communicating Effectively with Friends, Relatives
Like it or not, in your role you will almost certainly be in the position of talking with families and loved ones, either one-on-one or in a briefing. Yet most people have little experience or training in the critical skill of compassionate, candid, crisis communications. Providing timely and factual information is vital in crisis management. What is said and how the message is conveyed is fundamental to establishing trust with affected individuals, the community, and the public. This course will discuss the importance of message delivery in one-on-one conversations and group briefings, explore strategies for effective communications, and equip participants with simple methods for saying the right things -- even the hard things -- in the right ways.
Speaker:
Sue Warner-Bean - Crisis Response Strategist, NavAid Crisis Consulting Group

12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
Lunch
On own

1:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Did you know... How NCMEC's Facial Reconstruction Expertise and Team Adam support can help
NCMEC offers valuable resources to aid in the search and recovery of missing persons. This presentation will focus on Search and Recovery Strategies for Long Term Missing Children, including how and what law enforcement can do to prepare for a Team review, and site survey and assessment of their investigative efforts. It will cover how law enforcement can determine the probability of area, detection and success based on the information of the assessment. Attendees will learn how to identify the search environment, resources, equipment needed in search phase, methods and approaches, and recovery and excavation techniques.
Speakers:
Henry Schmidt - Team Adam, NCMEC | Collin McNally - Supervisor, Forensic Imaging Unit, NCMEC

1:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Persistent Pays Off- The John Wayne Gacy Investigation
In 2010, more than 30 years following the conviction of John Wayne Gacy Jr. for sexually assaulting, torturing, and murdering 33 young boys between 1972 and 1978, Detective Sergeant Moran found himself in front of a file cabinet labeled “GACY 1878”. He had been tasked by the Sheriff to find, and resurrect, potentially solvable cases. In the years since, Detective Sergeant Moran has dedicated his career to solving murders from one of the most notorious serial killers of this century. He created a template for law enforcement and the medico-legal community across the country for solving cold missing/unidentified person cases. To date he has closed 13 cases, the most recent one taking place in July 2017. Jason will talk about his work, lessons learned, and how this template and process can be used by other jurisdictions to solve some of the most difficult cases.
Speaker:
Jason Moran - Detective Sergeant, Cook County Sheriff's Police Department

1:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Beyond the Database: Using NamUs to Resolve Missing Unidentified Persons Cases
Get a sneak peek at NamUs 2.0! Upgrades to the NamUs system are coming soon. They will make it easier for everyone to use the system — from the input of new cases to searches across the databases. New features include enhanced workflows, advanced search capabilities, and an overall enhanced user experience. A new feature will offer a solution for reuniting families during Multiple Victim Events and its applications for Investigation, Search, Rescue, Reunification and Recovery. Attendees will be provided with hands-on training in entering cases, using the advanced search functions of NamUs, and exploring the potential match feature of NamUs. Case studies will illustrate the power of NamUs to search, match, and resolve long-term missing and unidentified person cases.
Speaker:
Carrie Sutherland - Regional System Administrator, NamUs



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Notice of Federal Funding and Federal Disclaimer
Notice of Federal Funding and Federal Disclaimer This Web site is funded in part through grants from BJA, COPS, ​OJJDP, OJP, OVC, SMART, and U.S. Department of Justice. Neither the U.S. Department of Justice nor any of its components operate, control, are responsible for, or necessarily endorse, this Web site (including, without limitation, its content, technical infrastructure, and policies, and any services or tools provided).​