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Reducing Recidivism: Improving Supervision Outcomes for FASD Probationers

Webinar


Research suggests that as many as 60% of adolescents and adults with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Disorder (FASD) come into contact with the criminal justice system. FASD is a prenatal brain injury that can make understanding and complying with probation conditions difficult, putting this population at higher risk for recidivism. Learn effective supervision strategies to improve supervision outcomes, prevent crime, and reduce recidivism.

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Details


About

Speaker: Ruth Richardson is the Director of Programs & National Strategic Initiatives, Minnesota Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome.

What's In It For You

During the webinar, you will: * Examine the challenges that Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) probationers have in meeting probation requirements * Explore reasons why probationers with FASD have a tendency to recidivate * Examine effective supervision and recidivism reduction strategies for this population * Obtain valuable resources and tools to assist you in supporting successful outcomes for probationers with FASD.

Is this training for you?

The following would benefit from this training:
• Community Member
• Correctional Officer
• Court System Personnel
• Social Workers
• Tribes/Tribal Partners
• Victim Service Providers

MOFAS Criminal Justice Fact Sheet
MOFAS Criminal Justice Fact Sheet
Publication

Individuals with an FASD are involved with the criminal justice system at an alarming rate. Youth and adults with an FASD have a form of brain damage that may make it difficult for them to stay out of trouble with the law. They do not know how to deal with police, attorneys, judges, social workers, psychiatrists, corrections and probation officers, and others they may encounter

Overlapping Characteristics
Overlapping Characteristics
Publication

Overlapping Behavioral Characteristics & Related Mental Health Diagnoses in Children

American Bar Association Resolution
American Bar Association Resolution
Publication

RESOLVED, That the American Bar Association urges attorneys and judges, state, local, and specialty bar associations, and law school clinical programs to help identify and respond effectively to Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) in children and adults, through training to enhance awareness of FASD and its impact on individuals in the child welfare, juvenile justice, and adult criminal justice systems and the value of collaboration with medical, mental health, and disability experts.

FASD Implications for Juvenile and Family Court Judges
FASD Implications for Juvenile and Family Court Judges
Publication

Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, or FASD, is a non-diagnostic umbrella term intended to encompass all the diagnostic categories designated by the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies (IOM) along a broad continuum of physical, mental, behavioral, and learning deficits that can result from prenatal alcohol exposure.

Sample Probation Conditions for FASD Probationers
Sample Probation Conditions for FASD Probationers
Document

Sample Probation Conditions for FASD Probationers

Reducing Recidivism: Improving Supervisions Outcomes for FASD Probationers
Reducing Recidivism: Improving Supervisions Outcomes for FASD Probationers
Document

This is the powerpoint presentation for the webinar hosted here: https://ncjtc.fvtc.edu/training/details/TR00000285/TRI0000286

All Scheduled Trainings

No other dates for this training are scheduled at this time.


Contact Information

Notice of Federal Funding and Federal Disclaimer
Notice of Federal Funding and Federal Disclaimer This Web site is funded in part through grants from BJA, COPS, ​OJJDP, OJP, OVC, SMART, and U.S. Department of Justice. Neither the U.S. Department of Justice nor any of its components operate, control, are responsible for, or necessarily endorse, this Web site (including, without limitation, its content, technical infrastructure, and policies, and any services or tools provided).​

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Our dedicated NCJTC staff will contact you within 2 business days of receipt of this request to discuss your needs and how we can help. We appreciate your interest in our training programs and look forward to serving you.

For questions, contact us at (855) 866-2582 or at info@ncjtc.org.

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Reducing Recidivism: Improving Supervision Outcomes for FASD Probationers

Research suggests that as many as 60% of adolescents and adults with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Disorder (FASD) come into contact with the criminal justice system. FASD is a prenatal brain injury that can make understanding and complying with probation conditions difficult, putting this population at higher risk for recidivism. Learn effective supervision strategies to improve supervision outcomes, prevent crime, and reduce recidivism.


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Please fill out all required fields.

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Sent successfully.

Thank you for requesting training and technical assistance!

Our dedicated NCJTC staff will contact you within 2 business days of receipt of this request to discuss your needs and how we can help. We appreciate your interest in our training programs and look forward to serving you.

For questions, contact us at (855) 866-2582 or at info@ncjtc.org.

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Notice of Federal Funding and Federal Disclaimer
Notice of Federal Funding and Federal Disclaimer This Web site is funded in part through grants from BJA, COPS, ​OJJDP, OJP, OVC, SMART, and U.S. Department of Justice. Neither the U.S. Department of Justice nor any of its components operate, control, are responsible for, or necessarily endorse, this Web site (including, without limitation, its content, technical infrastructure, and policies, and any services or tools provided).​