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Police/Citizen Contact: 4 Principles to Improve Relationships

Dec 13, 2017 | 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM CST | Webinar


Define and review the philosophy of community oriented policing. Discuss the four procedural justice/fair and impartial policing principles used for building effective relationships between citizens and law enforcement. Uncover strategies, tactics, and behaviors to: demonstrate dignity and respect for all, provide everyone with a voice, maintain neutrality and transparency, and earn and keep trust with those you serve.

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About

About the Speaker: Retired Chief of Police Rick Myers Rick recently retired after a 40 year career in policing, 33 of which he served as police chief in agencies as small as 5 employees to as large as 1000 total employees. Chief Myers studied under the pioneering professors of the now established philosophy of Community Oriented Policing at Michigan state University, and counts the father of Problem Solving Policing, Dr. Herman Goldstein, as his mentor. Chief Myers’ history of leading agencies with this combined blend that he calls COP/POP, ensured that everyone in the agency understood their ownership of this philosophy. Further, he has a history of supporting strong inter-agency collaboration, a very good quality for tribal policing to pursue.

Is this training for you?

The following would benefit from this training:
• Community Member
• Law Enforcement
• Law Enforcement Support
• Tribes/Tribal Partners

All Scheduled Trainings

No other dates for this training are scheduled at this time.


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Notice of Federal Funding and Federal Disclaimer This Web site is funded in part through grants from BJA, COPS, ​OJJDP, OJP, OVC, SMART, and U.S. Department of Justice. Neither the U.S. Department of Justice nor any of its components operate, control, are responsible for, or necessarily endorse, this Web site (including, without limitation, its content, technical infrastructure, and policies, and any services or tools provided).​

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Our dedicated NCJTC staff will contact you within 2 business days of receipt of this request to discuss your needs and how we can help. We appreciate your interest in our training programs and look forward to serving you.

For questions, contact us at (855) 866-2582 or at info@ncjtc.org.

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Police/Citizen Contact: 4 Principles to Improve Relationships

Define and review the philosophy of community oriented policing. Discuss the four procedural justice/fair and impartial policing principles used for building effective relationships between citizens and law enforcement. Uncover strategies, tactics, and behaviors to: demonstrate dignity and respect for all, provide everyone with a voice, maintain neutrality and transparency, and earn and keep trust with those you serve.


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Sent successfully.

Thank you for requesting training and technical assistance!

Our dedicated NCJTC staff will contact you within 2 business days of receipt of this request to discuss your needs and how we can help. We appreciate your interest in our training programs and look forward to serving you.

For questions, contact us at (855) 866-2582 or at info@ncjtc.org.

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Notice of Federal Funding and Federal Disclaimer
Notice of Federal Funding and Federal Disclaimer This Web site is funded in part through grants from BJA, COPS, ​OJJDP, OJP, OVC, SMART, and U.S. Department of Justice. Neither the U.S. Department of Justice nor any of its components operate, control, are responsible for, or necessarily endorse, this Web site (including, without limitation, its content, technical infrastructure, and policies, and any services or tools provided).​